Ocean Plastic Debris Education Research and Awareness

The Truth About Plastic Waste in the Worlds Oceans

NOAA

A Guide to Plastic in the Ocean

It’s a problem; 

but it’s one we can do something about.

Great Pacific Garbage Patch, OPDERA.ORG, plastic waste, plastic, ocean, ocean plastic
Plastics are the most common form of marine debris. They can come from a variety of land and ocean-based sources; enter the water in many ways; and impact the ocean and Great Lakes. Once in the water, plastic debris never fully biodegrades. Yellow text in the above graphic shows sources of plastic that eventually end up in the ocean. Orange text shows ways that these plastics move into the ocean. Red text provides examples of the harmful impacts of this debris. | Infographic Text

Smithsonian

Marine Plastic Waste Ocean Debris

Citizen Scientists

Great Pacific Garbage Patch, OPDERA.ORG, plastic waste, plastic, ocean, ocean plastic
Plastic surrounds us. It is not just the obvious places—like water bottles and straws. It is also used to build our cars and is found in our face washes and fabrics. With the invention of plastic in the early 20th century, we became a world that relished the privilege of cheap, easy-to-produce plastic pieces. Plastic has many benefits—it has allowed us to prevent heart attacks (stents that open up arteries are often made of plastic) and provide water to people in need. But it also has left a legacy of trash.
Great Pacific Garbage Patch, OPDERA.ORG, plastic waste, plastic, ocean, ocean plastic

Bisphenol A (BPA) is a chemical produced in large quantities for use primarily in the production of polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins.

Great Pacific Garbage Patch, OPDERA.ORG, plastic waste, plastic, ocean, ocean plastic
The primary source of exposure to BPA for most people is through the diet. While air, dust, and water are other possible sources of exposure, BPA in food and beverages accounts for the majority of daily human exposure.

Citizen Scientists

Great Pacific Garbage Patch, OPDERA.ORG, plastic waste, plastic, ocean, ocean plastic
Marine animals and plants from our coasts, like mussels, barnacles, and seaweeds, can settle on plastic pollution and circulate in the ocean for years, in some cases traveling far enough to reach new shores. Hitchhiking species introduced to new areas can cause local ecosystems to become unbalanced, by taking over the resources that local species need to survive.

Pew Research Center

Great Pacific Garbage Patch, OPDERA.ORG, plastic waste, plastic, ocean, ocean plastic
Perceptions and realities of recycling vary widely from place to place

NOAA Marine Debris Program

Great Pacific Garbage Patch, OPDERA.ORG, plastic waste, plastic, ocean, ocean plastic, Capt. Russ Johnson
The NOAA Marine Debris Program is the U.S. Federal government's lead for addressing marine debris.

Plastic waste inputs from land into the ocean

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OPDERA.ORG is a charity that raises awareness about plastic waste in the world’s oceans. They provide education about plastic waste. OPDERA.ORG visits the Great Pacific Garbage Patch to show you what is there and conduct research.

Find out more at www.opdera.org.

You can take the OPDERA pledge too! 

#opdera #reuse #oceanplastic #plasticwaste

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