Plastic is the deadliest marine life killer.

OPDERA, Great Pacific Garbage Patch, Environment, Marine Life, Recyling

The Guardian: “Plastic bags and flexible packaging are the deadliest plastic items in the ocean, killing wildlife including whales, dolphins, turtles, and seabirds around the globe. Whales, dolphins and turtles were especially at risk from eating plastic film, with seabird deaths linked more with ingestion of hard plastic pieces and balloons.” Learn more at:www.opdera.org Source:https://www.theguardian.com/…/deadliest-plastics-bags… […]

Plastic Marine Life

Have you ever wondered what marine life would like if it was made up partly of plastic? Watch this short video.

Waste Enters our Oceans Through Many Ways.

Great Pacific Garbage Patch, OPDERA.ORG, plastic waste, plastic, ocean, ocean plastic, reuse

waste reaching oceans includes sewage disposal, fertilizers from farms, solid garbage from cities/industries, and oil spills and drains. All of these raise the ocean’s contamination levels, which has already horrifyingly damaged the food chain of marine life.

Sharks are a Critically Endangered Species.

Great Pacific Garbage Patch, OPDERA.ORG, plastic waste, plastic, ocean, ocean plastic

The number of oceanic sharks and rays worldwide has fallen by 71% over the last 50 years, according to a study that found that some formerly abundant, wide-ranging species — including the Great Hammerhead — have declined so steeply that they are now classified as critically endangered.

There are 5.2 Trillion Pieces of Plastic in the Ocean.

Great Pacific Garbage Patch, OPDERA.ORG, plastic waste, plastic, ocean, ocean plastic

Although scientists have known for decades about the accumulating mass of ocean debris and its deadly consequences for seabirds, fish, and other marine animals, the science of sea trash is young and full of as-yet unsolved mysteries. Almost nothing was known about the amount of plastic in remote regions of the Southern Hemisphere, for example, until last year because few had ever traveled there to collect samples.