Most Plastic Waste Ends up in the Ocean.

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You might be surprised, or even disgusted, to learn that most plastic waste ends up in the environment, even when you thought it was being recycled. Research shows plastic waste most commonly leaks into the environment in the country to which it’s shipped. Plastics that you put in the recycling bin were never intended to […]

Plastic Marine Life

Have you ever wondered what marine life would like if it was made up partly of plastic? Watch this short video.

80% of Marine Pollution Originates on Land.

Great Pacific Garbage Patch, OPDERA.ORG, plastic waste, plastic, ocean, ocean plastic, reuse

The harm caused by plastic pollution is wide-ranging. It chokes wildlife above and below the waterline. An estimated one million sea birds and an unknown number of sea turtles die each year due to plastic debris clogging their digestive tracts, and marine animals of all sorts can become tangled and incapacitated by discarded fishing lines […]

Waste Enters our Oceans Through Many Ways.

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waste reaching oceans includes sewage disposal, fertilizers from farms, solid garbage from cities/industries, and oil spills and drains. All of these raise the ocean’s contamination levels, which has already horrifyingly damaged the food chain of marine life.

Sharks are a Critically Endangered Species.

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The number of oceanic sharks and rays worldwide has fallen by 71% over the last 50 years, according to a study that found that some formerly abundant, wide-ranging species — including the Great Hammerhead — have declined so steeply that they are now classified as critically endangered.

People Consume Microplastic Without Knowledge or Consent.

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Greenpeace’s research has found that Taiwanese annually eat at least 16,300 units, or 1.05 grams, of microplastics from shellfish, cephalopods (including octopi and squids), and fish, which is equivalent to a single plastic straw.